Bygone news: 22 Sep 1916 – The Macclesfield Times

News from the Macclesfield Times and East Cheshire Observer of Friday 22nd September 1916.

Roll of Honour; Other News; Price of Bread

 

ROLL OF HONOUR

WIFE AND FIVE CHILDREN BEREAVED – MISSING TERRITORIAL’S FATE
Three more local soldiers have to be added to the Roll of Honour this week, and in one case a wife and five children bear the loss of a husband and father, who was killed through the accidental discharge of a bomb in the trenches while making preparations for an attack. The death of Private John Hodgson, a Territorial, who has been missing since the landing at Suvla Bay, is now officially presumed.

 

KILLED IN HIS DUG-OUT – WIFE AND FIVE CHILDREN BEREAVED

Information has reached Mrs Moores (sic), 9 Lower Bank St, Macclesfield, to the effect that her husband, Private James Moores, has been killed in action. The sad news was conveyed in a letter from a comrade, who stated that Private Moores was killed by a shell which dropped onto the dug-out.

Private Moores was 31 years of age and was in the South Lancashire Regt. He had been at the front twelve months and enlisted two years ago. He leaves a widow and five children. Private Moores’ brother is serving in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, and a brother-in-law is a gunner in the Navy.

 

FATAL BOMB ACCIDENT – LOCAL SOLDIER’S FATE IN THE TRENCHES
Private J Butterworth, Cheshire Regt, of King Edward St, Macclesfield, was killed in France on 1st inst. Mrs Butterworth received the following letter… “Jack was in very good spirits and was cleaning his rifle to get everything ready for action when a boy with us accidentally pulled the detonator out of a bomb, which immediately exploded, killing Jack and wounding some of his comrades…”
Private Butterworth, who was 30 years of age, was the son of Mr John Butterworth, 154 Crompton Road, and his father was formerly the caretaker of the Macclesfield Liberal Club. The deceased was educated at Crompton Road School and as a boy was in the choir at the Old Church. He had been employed at Alderman P Davenport’s Mill for the past sixteen years. Private Butterworth enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment in November 1914 and was drafted out to France the following July. A few months ago he was wounded in the right knee and spent some time in the hospital at Rouen, but did not return to England. The deceased leaves a wife and four children.

 

TERRITORIAL’S FATE – MISSING SOLDIER’S DEATH PRESUMED
Mr Albert Hodgson, 6 Knight’s Brow, Macclesfield, has received a communication from the Record Office at Shrewsbury stating that “as no further information has been received of your son, Private John Hodgson, Cheshire Regt, who has been missing since August 9th 1915, the Army Council have been regretfully constrained to conclude that he is dead and that his death took place on August 9th 1915.”

Private Hodgson was 21 years of age and enlisted shortly after the outbreak of war. He was drafted out to the Dardanelles and was reported missing after the landing at Suvla Bay. He was a native of Macclesfield and was educated at the Lord street Day School, and formerly attended the Park Street Chapel. Prior to joining up Private Hodgson was employed at the Slipper Works, Sunderland street. A memorial service will be held at Park Street Chapel on Sunday.

 

LIEUT WHITE HOME ON LEAVE
Lieut. Frank White, son of Mr and Mrs White, Beech Lane, Macclesfield, is home on leave from Egypt, where he has been serving with the Macclesfield Territorials. He went out with the battalion to the Dardanelles, and took part in the Suvla Bay landing… and remained on the Peninsula until the evacuation, when he was transferred with the regiment to Egypt. For some time he acted as a company commander…. Lieut. White has been granted five weeks’ leave.

 

LIEUT RICHARDS WOUNDED

On Thursday last week Second-Lieutenant J Richards, son of Lieut and Mrs Richards of St John’s Rd, Macclesfield, arrived home from France suffering from slight wounds and shell-shock. Seven weeks ago Second-Lieut. Richards left for the front for the second time, and altogether has seen ten months active service. He took part int he battle of the Somme and was slightly wounded last Friday. He was conveyed to England on Tuesday and after spending two days in hospital left for Macclesfield on two months’ leave.

 

HURDSFIELD ‘KNUT’ WOUNDED

Private Charles Wallworth, of the Cheshire Regt, son of Mrs Wallworth, 59 Garden St, Macclesfield, has been wounded with shrapnel in the right thigh while fighting in France, and is now progressing satisfactorily in hospital at Levenshulme. Private Wallworth is 22 years of age and had previously served int he local territorials. He was called up on the outbreak of war, being at the time employed as a fireman by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway at Newton Heath. Private Wallworth received his education at Daybrook St School… [and] also attended Hurdsfield Church. Private Wallworth was a member of the comradeship known as the Hurdsfield ‘Knuts’ and has been at the front nearly two years…

 

OTHER NEWS

LIEUT J C CLOSE-BROOKS, J.P.
A memorial service for the late Lieut. John Charles Close-Brooks, J.P., 1st Life Guards, who was killed in the battle of Zandevoorde on October 30th, 1914, was held at the Parish Church, Macclesfield, on Wednesday night. There was a crowded congregation….

 

BREAD UP AGAIN – ANOTHER HALFPENNY ON THE LOAF – STANDARD PRICE AND WEIGHT REQUIRED

…in London the 4lb loaf is being sold at 9d … and strong complaints are being made. In Macclesfield, however… as much as 10d and over is being charged for 4lbs of bread, and what was normally a 2lb loaf weighs anything… from 1lb 8oz to 1lb 12oz, while the charge… was 4d. It has now advanced in many cases to 4½d…. bread buyers are entirely in the hands of the sellers… What is being done… in Macclesfield to insist upon the Bread Act being observed? …there is no standard weight of a loaf… [At] the Co-operative Society the price of the 4lb loaf has been increased from 8d to 8½d for ordinary and from 9d to 9½d for the best. With some of the bakers it has been customary… to reduce the weight and charge the same amount…

Under the Act, bread must be sold by weight only… and the [purchaser] can require it to be weighed… Refusal to weigh when requested… renders the seller liable to a penalty of £5, and any person who sells other than by weight is liable to a penalty of £2…. the only exception from the requirement to sell bread by weight is in the case of ‘fancy’ bread.

 


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